Social Media Becomes a Lifeline in the Nepal Earthquake Aftermath

In Kathmandu, Nepal, there was an earthquake that was one of the worst ones to hit the country in 80 years. Social media has helped tremendously with providing vital information within a couple hours after the earthquake stuck. People were tweeting and uploading pictures of the data so others around the world could see just how bad the damage was. People are using social media to crowd source all of their information now.

Social media becomes a lifeline

The Unstoppable Rise of Social Media as a Source for News

Just yesterday, Facebook tweaked its algorithm behind its news feed technology. Social media, Facebook in particular, are now hugely important sources of traffic for news outlet. The reason for this move is simple: this is where a young people get most of their news.

Television is still quite popular across all age groups with social media not far behind.

Unstoppable rise of social media as a source for news

4 Do’s & 4 Don’ts for Business Using Social Media

There are 4 do’s & 4 don’ts for businesses using social media. 

Do’s

  1. Know who you are
  2. Understand your audience
  3. Plan ahead
  4. Adopt a test and learn methodology

Don’ts

  1. Don’t wait until after the fact
  2. Don’t make assumptions about your audience 
  3. Don’t assume that your presence on social media means you know everything about it
  4. Don’t get comfortable 

4 Do’s & 4 Don’ts for Business Using Social Media

Social Media Can Help Track Tornadoes

Just last week, there was a big storm in Rockford, Ill and students prepared to track the storm using Twitter. The new software was developed by Purdue University, the Department of Homeland Security, and the National Weather Service. the all huddled around laptops to analyze the amount of tweets coming from the storm area. They were searching for keywords such as “damage” or “tornado” and pictures of funnel clouds.

Social media can track a storm’s path of destruction just as radar does. Looking at the storms tracks and the people tweeting; it maps out nicely where the damage has actually occurred. The National Weather Service hopes that this new software will help warn people of the damages of the storm approaching.

After the storm occurred, they pulled up a map showing blue-green blobs near where the storm had occurred. This was where the most tweets were that had keywords related to safety, security, and severe weather.

Like any program, there are still kinks to work out but the general idea for a specific algorithm to aid in storm preparedness and awareness will hopefully save many lives in the future.

Social Media Can Help Track Tornadoes, But Was That Tweet Real?

Alcohol Industry has Excellent Timing

Alcohol companies are using social media to boost their sales by linking to sporting success. Sports and drinking have always had a good relationship between one another. Researchers say that “Social media is a really powerful form for going beyond just passive recipients of communication messages to really be able to interact and engage.”

The brands usea range of mediums from smartphone apps all the way to celebrity endorsements and promotional items to engage with consumers and gain access to their extended social networks. Social media, if anything, is making the connection between sports and drinking stronger.

Connection between alcohol and sports

A new way to avoid your family

A third of “digital natives” are ignoring Facebook because their parents are using it. Studies show that “digital converters” are catching up to “digital natives” in terms of smartphones and technology. 85% of digital natives have a smartphone and 59% have a tablet. People 55 and over or digital converters are 52%owning a smartphone and 49% owning a tablet.

The digital natives are becoming annoyed with their parents being on social media. They now feel that they have to hide from their family members. But they shouldn’t feel the need to hide unless they are doing something that they don’t want their family members finding out.

Young leave social media to avoid family